LADOT announces update to Vision Zero High Injury Network

This month, LADOT updated the Vision Zero High Injury Network (HIN), the network of city streets where we can make the biggest difference in our efforts to save lives. The update can be found on the City’s Geo Hub, our public platform for exploring and visualizing location-based open data.

The first iteration of the HIN launched in 2016 and was based on collision data available from 2009-2013. Though only 6% of Los Angeles’ street miles are on the HIN, we found that nearly seventy percent of all deaths and severe injuries of people walking occurred on this network. The HIN helps us focus our safety efforts, maximize resources and save lives.

Vision Zero’s 2017 Action Plan called for an update of the City’s High-Injury Network using new collision data made available by the Statewide Integrated Traffic Records System (SWITRS). As a first step, we mapped fatalities and serious injury collisions (KSIs) involving people walking and bicycling using the most recent data (2012-2016). With this new data set, we found that the corridors with a high density of KSIs from 2012-2016 were nearly the same as the HIN corridors identified previously. This information will be used to identify a new round of priority corridors for safety improvements.

Many of the Vision Zero improvements on the High Injury Network began installation in May 2017 and safety data over that time has not yet been included in our High Injury Network analysis (SWITRS data from 2017 and 2018). Where we’ve made Vision Zero improvements and have available safety data, like the Hollywood and Highland intersections, we’ve seen positive results. See attn. Media’s coverage of the scramble here. As new data becomes available and incorporated, we hope to see fatalities decline and remove streets from the HIN.

Changes to the HIN

Our HIN updates can be categorized into the following types:

  • Additions: We identified three new streets (6th St, Glenoaks Blvd, and Glendale Blvd) that witnessed a high number of KSI collisions between 2012 and 2016 yet were not part of the original HIN. Seventeen KSI collisions involving a pedestrian or a bicyclist occurred on just 2.8 miles of these streets in the last 5 years.
  • Extensions: We also saw that a high number of bicycle and pedestrian collisions occurred at the edges of the existing HIN. To capture these new hotspots of collision activity, we have extended 13 of the existing HIN corridors.
  • Connections: We identified two streets (Vanowen St and Central Ave) where we connected existing HIN corridors based on the newer collision data.

High Injury Network Changes

 

Street To/From HIN Modification Miles Bicycle and Pedestrian  KSI Collisions KSIs per Mile
6th St. Ogden Dr./Cochran Ave. New Corridor 0.7 6 8.6
Glenoaks Blvd. Peoria St./Roscoe Blvd. New Corridor 1.6 7 4.4
Glendale Blvd. Revere Ave./Glenhurst St. New Corridor 0.5 4 8.0
48th St. Crenshaw Blvd./Western Ave. Extension 1.2 6 5.0
Vanowen St. Woodman Ave./Ethel Ave. Connection 0.8 3 3.8
Vanowen St. Hatillo Ave./De Soto Ave. Extension 1.2 5 4.2
Nordhoff St. Haskell Ave./Reseda Blvd Extension 1.8 7 3.9
Riverside Dr. Laurelgrove Ave. /Van Nuys Blvd. Extension 2.7 6 2.2
Ventura Blvd. Topanga Canyon/Fallbrook Ave. Extension 0.9 4 4.4
Normandie Ave. Melrose Ave./Beverly Blvd. Extension 0.5 5 10.0
Beverly Blvd. Bonnie Brae St./Rampart Blvd. Extension 0.5 5 10.0
Olympic Blvd. Crenshaw Blvd./La Brea Ave. Extension 1.3 6 4.6
Washington Blvd. La Brea Ave./Redondo Blvd. Extension 0.3 4 13.3
Vermont Ave. 88th St./120th St. Extension 2.4 9 3.8
Central Ave. Slauson Blvd./Manchester Ave. Connection 2.1 10 4.8
Cesar E Chavez Ave Keller St./ Vignes St Extension 0.3 5 16.7
Total: 18.8 92 4.9

 

In total, these additions to the HIN cover 19 miles, but account for over 90 bicycle and pedestrian KSI collisions in the last 5 years. After making these modifications to the network, the share of bicycle and pedestrian KSIs on the HIN remains at roughly two-thirds (64 percent).

This updated HIN is available on the City’s GeoHub. We will also be publishing the updated collision data to the GeoHub as well, so stay tuned!

Vision Zero High Injury Network Prioritization

At the May 17 convening of the Vision Zero Task Force, the Los Angeles Department of Transportation (LADOT) presented a new version of the High Injury Network (HIN) map. This new map includes a new score for each intersection to begin to prioritize Vision Zero efforts in Los Angeles.

LADOT has been undertaking a technical collisions analysis as part of the initial steps towards a Vision Zero work plan. This analysis seeks to find patterns among the various collisions along the HIN to better inform approaches to engineering, education, and enforcement. However, while the HIN represents only 6% of the city’s street network, at roughly 450 miles there is still need for additional location prioritization.

Thus, the Vision Zero team developed a series of six potential location-based priorities for developing a “intersection score” to begin to prioritize locations along the HIN, listed below:

  • Severity: Locations with the highest amount of severe or fatal injury (KSI) collisions
  • Vulnerability: Locations with KSI collisions that involve older adults or children
  • Social Equity: Locations within traditionally underinvested in or underserved communities
  • Geography: Locations that have the most collisions in an Area Planning Commission, Council District, or other zones
  • Dangerous Behavior: Focus on locations that involve KSI collisions resulting from dangerous behavior
  • Low-Cost, Low-Complexity: Focus on locations that can be easily fixed through low-cost and low-complexity countermeasures.

These six potential priorities were put to a survey with the Vision Zero Alliance, the Vision Zero Executive Steering Committee, the Vision Zero Task Force, the city’s Pedestrian and Bicycle Advisory Committees, and each of the City Council offices. Additionally, the Vision Zero Alliance distributed the survey in an online setting to their network.

After 522 online surveys, 62 in person surveys, and a variety of in-person feedback, LADOT received the following results:

Safety Priority Combined Weighted Score
Severity 0.478
Vulnerability 0.361
Social Equity 0.333
Dangerous Behavior 0.303
Geography 0.273
Inexpensive & Simple 0.252

 

Based on this feedback, the following methodology was developed for scoring each intersection on the HIN

Intersection Score = count_fatal_ksi*1.5 (weighted higher for severity) + count_severe_ksi (raw value) + child_senior (0 or 1 if child/senior was present in KSI) + target_community (0 or 1 if location in target community)

This new map has afforded each of the Vision Zero Subcommittees the ability to zero in on locations that are higher priority. Stay tuned for the launch of the Vision Zero Action Plan, which will include a prioritized list of corridors and intersections on this map.

Other interesting facts:

The highest scoring intersection, at 7.5, was Bonnie Brae / Olympic.

No one intersection had a severe/fatal count higher than 7 (from 2009 – 2013)

Only 46 intersections involved more than 1 child/senior in a KSI collision

CORO Fellows draft Vision Zero Education Strategy

The Coro Fellowship in Public Affairs is a rigorous and demanding program designed to give fellows real-world experience working within local government to design and research innovative policies. This year, Vision Zero was very fortunate to be partnered with two Coro Fellows who were tasked with drafting our Education Strategy. Over the course of five weeks, Rachel Keyser and Julia Gould worked tirelessly to develop this report which includes interviews with 46 Los Angeles stakeholders, a literature review, and numerous key insights into how we can best message Vision Zero in Los Angeles in order to create culture shift. This report will serve as an indispensable resource for our education sub-committee, our communications consultant, and ultimately our Vision Zero Action Plan.

Three “guiding principals” were used in developing the report’s purposes:

  1. Increase overall awareness of Vision Zero, the issue of traffic safety, and impacts of dangerous road behavior;
  2. Facilitate a Los Angeles culture shift toward shared responsibility in road safety, the preventability of traffic deaths, and the idea that even one traffic death is unacceptable;
  3. Motivate safer traffic behavior among all those who travel in Los Angeles, with emphasis on demographics most likely to exhibit dangerous behavior.

 

In addressing these principals, the report developed an extensive methodology aimed at finding the most efficient and effective ways of educating people about Vision Zero. By combining qualitative data from interviews, quantitative data from an in-depth analysis of crash statistics, and supplemental information from Vision Zero campaigns in other cities, the report provided the following recommendations:

  1. Use multi-faceted mediums, message-tested content, grounded in behavior change theory to target high-risk populations and behaviors at both the individual and institutional levels.
  2. Mass-media and on-the-ground education efforts will need to be tailored to specific population segments based on campaign priorities and additional market research.
  3. Messaging content should stem from the underlying factors that drive dangerous behavior, as well as barriers to the successful adoption of Vision Zero core principles.
  4. Overall, the campaign should seek to not only raise awareness of Vision Zero, but change behaviors through shifting social norms around transportation and traffic safety.

 

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Vision Zero Los Angeles at Big Data Big Cities Conference in Toronto, ON

From June 12 – 15 2015, Vision Zero Los Angeles took part in the first ever “Big (Transportation) Data Big Cities” Conference in Toronto, ON, hosted by the City of Toronto and the University of Toronto. The Toronto Transportation Services Department has recently developed a data analytics group, under General Manager Stephen Buckley and led by Jesse Coleman, who put the conference together.

The days’ events focused on the growing use of “big data” in transportation departments, academia, and industry. The first day of moderated sessions primarily focused on industry’s approach to transportation data, and included presentations from companies like IBM, TomTom, Thales and Here. There was a robust back-and-forth discussion on the challenges for industry to meet the needs of the public sector.

The second day of moderated sessions included mainly public sector and academic presentations, with no one from industry in the room. This allowed for candid conversations about how transportation departments are incorporating big data analyses into their workplans, and the challenges of recruiting technical staff to the public sector.

The Los Angeles Department of Transportation (LADOT) was represented by Jay Kim, Assistant General Manager for Mobility Management, George Chen, lead engineer of the ATSAC research team, and Nat Gale, Principal Project Coordinator in the Active Transportation Division. George presented on the history and current use of the ATSAC data, and Nat presented on Vision Zero’s assembly and analysis of collision data, as well as a few recent use cases. Overall, the conference provided an important starting point in what will be an on-going discussion on the role of cities in the big data movement. The final day involved a discussion around next steps, including the desire to develop more opportunities for knowledge-sharing and developing data standards. Stay tuned for what comes out of this group!

 

Vision Zero receives City’s First Artist In-Residence

The City of Los Angeles recently hired its first artist-in- residence, Alan Nakagawa, as part of Mayor Garcetti’s plan to embed new creative energy into City departments. Mr. Nakagawa will work with the Department of Transportation focusing exclusively on Vision Zero, the City’s ambitious goal to eliminate traffic fatalities by 2025. A critical piece to the strategy of getting to zero includes changing the culture surrounding traffic collisions, which are still often dismissed as unavoidable “accidents.”

Seleta Reynolds, General Manager of the City of Los Angeles Department of Transportation, realizes this potential of art to achieve this change. “Vision Zero is a bold goal: zero traffic fatalities by 2025, which will require conventional tools like engineering and enforcement, as well as unconventional tools like art and storytelling. We plan to infuse art into the design and function of the public realm to create safe, beautiful, great streets.”

Mr. Nakagawa’s training is in studio arts, sound, and public art. His most recent position was as a Senior Public Arts Officer for LA Metro, and his past experience includes working with hundreds of communities across Los Angeles and multi-disciplinary public transportation design teams. He is the first artist in the Creative Catalyst Artist in Residence Program, developed by the Department of Cultural Affairs to connect Angelenos with Mayor Garcetti’s vision for a safer, more sustainable, and dynamic Los Angeles.

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Los Angeles Vision Zero at Peds Count! 2016 Conference

Vision Zero Los Angeles recently presented as part of panel at the Peds Count! 2016 Summit hosted by California Walks in Long Beach, California. The Vision Zero panel, moderated by Leah Shaum of the Vision Zero Network, included members of the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (LACDPH), the City of Los Angeles Department of Transportation (LADOT), the Advancement Project, and Walk San Francisco.

Members of the Vision Zero Los Angeles team, including Kim Porter of LACDPH and Jacqui Swartz of LADOT, presented on the cross-departmental collaboration and the use of data to drive the location prioritization process in Los Angeles.

Los Angeles Recognized as Vision Zero Leader

Today, Los Angeles was selected as one of 10 leading cities to participate in a new national program to advance Vision Zero, the goal of eliminating traffic fatalities and severe injuries among all road users. Mayor Eric Garcetti launched the Vision Zero Los Angeles initiative on August 24, 2015 by signing Executive Directive #10, declaring safety to be the number one priority in designing and building our streets and sidewalks.

This new Vision Zero Focus Cities program was launched today by the Vision Zero Network, a national collaborative campaign aimed at advancing this shift towards safety, health, and equitable mobility for all. In addition to Los Angeles, other cities included in this program will be: Austin, TX; Washington, DC; New York City, NY; Boston, MA; Chicago, IL; Fort Lauderdale, FL; Seattle, WA; Portland, OR; and San Francisco, CA.

“Los Angeles is proud to join the Vision Zero Focus Cities program,” said Seleta Reynolds, General Manager of the Los Angeles Department of Transportation and President of the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO). “Our shared goals to stop traffic deaths are ambitious and urgent.  We will get there faster together by learning from one another.”

The 10 cities were chosen based on their positions as – or expectations to become – national leaders in Vision Zero. Additionally, they were required to demonstrate a commitment to work collaboratively with their peers to improve upon their traffic safety efforts and serve as models for other cities.

“We recognize Los Angeles’ leadership in being an early-adopter of Vision Zero and dedicating its staff and resources toward prioritizing safety for all who are walking, bicycling and driving,” said Shahum. “We know that Los Angeles is serious in its commitment to reach zero traffic fatalities and severe injuries, and we commend their willingness to partner with peers in other Vision Zero cities to make greater progress not only locally but across the nation in safe streets for all.”

Lead participants in the Focus Cities program will include representatives of each city’s Mayor’s Office, Transportation Department, Police Department, and Public Health Department. In addition, there will be a concurrent track for collaboration among leading Vision Zero community advocates from each of the Focus Cities.

“Los Angeles Walks applauds the Vision Zero Network for launching the Focus Cities Program, and comments the City of Los Angeles for its inclusion,” said Deborah Murphy, founder and Executive Director of Los Angeles Walks, a pedestrian advocacy organization. “Every year in Los Angeles, over 200 people are killed on city streets – almost half of them while walking and biking. There is no time to spare when it comes to implementing better street design, targeted education, and strategic enforcement that creates safe, equitable walking environments and saves lives.”

To learn more about the Focus Cities Program, see http://visionzeronetwork.org or contact Leah Shahum at leah@visionzeronetwork.org

To learn more about the Los Angeles Vision Zero Initiative, see http://visionzero-prod.azurewebsites.net/ or contact visionzero@lacity.org.